CNEWA – 90 Years, 90 Heroes: Brother Joseph Loewenstein, FSC

CNEWA – 90 Years, 90 Heroes: Brother Joseph Loewenstein, FSC

One of the most familiar fixtures at Bethlehem University for several decades has been Brother Joseph Loewenstein, FSC. Affectionately known as “Brother Joe”, he has been a member of the CNEWA family for a long time. For several years, in the 1980’s, he served as the director of our regional office in Jerusalem.

He’s also a rarity: a CNEWA hero who has actually been around longer than CNEWA.

The university’s magazine saluted him shortly after his 90th birthday, in October of 2015, and told some of his story:

Brother Joe was born in Queens, New York, in 1925 where he grew up during the depression. With two siblings, his parents had three children to attend to in those difficult economic times. Brother Joe attended an elementary school run by Dominican Sisters, the parochial school of the Brooklyn diocese of Elmhurst, Queens. The diocese offered scholarships for students to its secondary school, Bishop Loughlin Memorial High School, which was run by the De La Salle Christian Brothers. “I always wanted to be a priest,” Brother Joe says. “But at school I became interested in joining the Brothers. At 15 years old, Brother Joe left home to go to a training school for boys interested in joining the Brothers. “We were encouraged to focus on the vocation, and at that time it was common to leave home for that purpose”, Brother Joe explains. He graduated in 1943 and went to Novitiate for one year’s training in the Brotherhood, after which he enrolled in Catholic University in Washington D.C. His class was sent to various schools after three years, before completing their Bachelor’s degrees, since there was a shortage of teachers during World War II.

When Brother Joe came to Bethlehem University in 1975, he was ready for a new challenge.

That new challenge was to serve as the university’s second president, a position he held for seven years. Forty-two years after he arrived in Bethlehem, he is still active at the school, continuing to help shape young lives.

We got in touch with him recently, and he offered a few thoughts on CNEWA (better known in the Middle East as Pontifical Mission):

“The work of CNEWA/Pontifical Mission is quite different from teaching and being cooped up in the classroom all day. It made a lasting impression on me to this very day, which is difficult to explain. The classroom and labs are quite immobile and inside, with rare opportunities to be outside. I had spent all my life working with young men — wonderful work, but rather narrow in scope, between walls with regular hours and specific topics. That was life in the ‘Ivory Tower’. But there is a world outside the classroom”.

One example — and perhaps the most outstanding for me — was visiting several handicapped children, living in a recently established center converted from a school to a home for mentally disabled children (with the help of CNEWA/Pontifical Mission — that was why I was there).

I had never worked with handicapped children. I was scared stiff the first time I visited the home. But seeing the children of all ages (including babies) made me want to cry, but gave me the strength to continue my regular monthly visits. […]

 

[…] Today the most important work is the same as at my time: helping others. That means helping them earn a living, helping with medical needs or housing, especially when their house was destroyed or residents evicted. It also means helping, especially, the children, who often go hungry.

That philosophy lies at the heart of CNEWA’s mission, as well. We’re proud to have shared in that work with Brother Joe and the dedicated people at Bethlehem University. Ad multos annos!

Ref.: Text adapted for the Institute’s website. The original version available on https://goo.gl/RjePgU

 

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